CATO Institute

  • Why Conservatives Shouldn’t Support Federal Paid Parental Leave

    Vanessa Brown Calder A number of Republican senators are flirting with proposals for government-supported paid-leave programs at the federal level, and recently on these pages, former senator Rick Santorum jumped into the fray to make the case for one. Santorum argues that it’s “good policy and good politics,” and that therefore Republicans should be proactive…

    Read More »
  • History Shows Forcing Companies to Put Workers on Boards Is a Bad Idea

    Ryan Bourne A quiet revolution in Left-wing economic thinking is bubbling on both sides of the Atlantic. The Labour Party here and Democrats in America are embracing the Continental view that the “Anglo-Saxon” economic model is just too short-termist, and too obsessed with maximising near-term share prices. To “transform capitalism,” both parties are considering legislating…

    Read More »
  • Google Is a Tricky Case but Conservatives Please Stay Strong — Reject the Temptation to Regulate the Internet

    John Samples Everyone involved in politics has bad days, when one’s interests conflict with one’s ideals. Some conservatives had a bad day on Tuesday when Google CEO Sundar Pachai appeared before Congress to respond to allegations of anti-conservative bias at Google. Since at least the presidency of Ronald Reagan, conservatives have stood for limited, constitutional…

    Read More »
  • If You Thought Scrooge Was Bad, Consider the Victorian Home

    Chelsea Follett We owe many popular Christmas traditions to Victorian England, from carols and decorated trees to gift-giving. These cheerful traditions stand in stark contrast with our recognition of the nightmarish working conditions at the time. In Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, for example, the miserly businessman Ebenezer Scrooge exemplifies the alleged spirit of the…

    Read More »
  • Washington’s Short-Term Thinking Won’t Head off the Coming Debt Crisis

    Michael D. Tanner Recently, The Daily Beast reported that when President Trump was briefed early last year about the future consequences of the federal debt, he replied bluntly, “Yeah, but I won’t be here.” It would be easy to shake our heads at yet another example of the president’s inability to think beyond the present.…

    Read More »
  • Nationalism and Populism Detrimental to Freedom

    Tanja Porčnik and Visio Institut With the rise of nationalism, populism, and hybrid forms of authoritarianism, freedom has been for years under assault in many parts of the world. Unsurprisingly, among the countries with the most substantial deteriorations in freedom in recent years are Turkey and Poland, both experiencing evident weakening of the rule of…

    Read More »
  • The Battle Inside the Political Parties for the Future of U.S. Foreign Policy

    Emma Ashford and A. Trevor Thrall “The time is long overdue for a vigorous discussion about our foreign policy, and how it needs to change in this new era.” -Sen. Bernie Sanders “The United States needs a national security doctrine around which a consensus can be built — both between the Democratic and the Republican…

    Read More »
  • Dehumanization Nations

    Matt Daniels and Doug Bandow As media and political leaders increasingly embrace dehumanizing stereotypes of ideological opponents, America risks drifting down a dark path. Apologists for Antifa label as “fascist” those with opposing ideologies and politics, while others deride half of the American electorate as “Demoncrats.” Some may secretly cheer such insults. Doing so, however,…

    Read More »
  • The Fateful Arrest That Could Poison America’s Relationship with China

    Doug Bandow Amid controversy over a maybe yes/maybe no ceasefire in Donald Trump’s trade war with China, the United States engineered the arrest by Canada of a top Chinese executive for allegedly busting U.S. sanctions on Iran. The detention sparked outrage in Beijing, which threatened Canada with “grave consequences” if Meng Wanzhou is not released.…

    Read More »
  • The Government Must Resist Micro-Managing Our EU Exit

    Ryan Bourne Unlike many commentators, I believe that a no-deal Brexit still very possible. It is the default as the clock ticks, and parliament must vote for government-backed legislation to change path. For all the threats about a second referendum, the Conservatives would implode if they rowed back on delivering Brexit. And as regrettable as…

    Read More »
Close